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Evaporated Milk Bottle


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When I was a kid, I used to circle the tricks I wanted soooo badly from the Tannen's #11 catalog.  There was one called "the Invisible Mosquito" where (according to the catalog) the magician would show a glass of milk, and after introducing his invisible mosquito to the edge of the glass, the milk would visibly go down in the glass  -- apparently being consumed by a thirsty invisible mosquito.  Never owned that one, because it cost $50 (and that was back in 1973).  I am sure this is NOT the same thing, but the effect can be the same if you want to play it for Invisible Mosquito laughs. An ordinary looking milk bottle is shown full of milk.  Then visibly, the milk begins to vanish, the level sinking lower and lower.  For kids shows, the invisible fly or mosquito patter works great.   Or you can team it up with a Liquid Appear effect and have milk visibly vanish from the bottle and re-appear in your Liquid Appear apparatus.  You can even use it like a regular Vanishing Milk Pitcher, pourting the milk into a cone, then showing it has vanished.   Made of plastic, so a bit more durable than glass.  Bottle is about 9 inches tall, more or less the size of a real milk bottle.

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Diminishing Milk Glasses
A nicely made version of the classic Multum in Parvo trick, where milk is poured from a large glass into a smaller glass, then into an even smaller glass, and finally into a tiny glass. The glasses are heavy duty plastic, much more durable than real glass for the working magician. The big glass is 5.5" tall and 3" in diameter. The second glass is 4" tall, the third is just over 3" tall, and the mini glass is just 2" tall with a 2" diameter. This is a stunning visual effect with automatic audience appeal. As the milk seemingly shrinks from one glass to the next, finally ending up in a tiny little glass, which can be given out to drink, or gulped down by the magician. Great, great magic!! Kids go wild to see the big glass of milk squeezed into a tiny (almost shot-size) glass.
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Deluxe Foo Can (with handle)
My favorite Foo Can design...and I must have about 6-7 foo cans!    It looks like a milk or creamer pitcher, about 6" tall, with a handle to add to the natural look of the prop. 

For those not familiar with the Foo can effect:  water poured into the can is caused to vanish, and can reappear at anytime. You have control of liquid in the can so that it may be turned over and liquid does not, or does, come out as you choose.    I love to show this as a milk pitcher, but turn it over to show it is empty...then blow up a rubber glove, and milk the fingers (like udders) over the can. When this silliness concludes, milk is poured from the can!

A great utility prop.    Beautiful metal construction to last a lifetime. 

The can holds 1.5 cups (about 750ml) when completely filled.  This includes the initial pour to "empty" the Foo can.  So you can pour out about 2/3 of a cup of water (or 375ml) apparently emptying it,  and then pour the same amount again.  If you want to start by simply turning the can upside down to show it empty, and then having liquid appear inside, it will hold about 2/3 of a cup.

Brand new, with instructions.  

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